Sweet & Savory Whole Wheat Crepes

I love crepes.  Versatile, elegant, and quick, they can be used for breakfast, dessert or dinner.

If you make them with whole grains, (and you all know my point of view on whole grains), they are not only delicious but good for you.

Sweet & Savory Whole Wheat Crepes
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Dish, Breakfast, or Dessert
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 10 crepes
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 2 T butter, melted and cooled
  • 2 large eggs
  • Additional butter for skillet
Instructions
  1. Add all ingredients to a blender; pulse for 5 seconds until blended; allow batter to rest in the refrigerator for 1 to 48 hours. (This is important if you want a crepe with a silky texture).
  2. Heat a 10-inch Teflon non-stick skillet over medium-high heat and grease with a bit of butter. Ladle about ¼ cup of batter in the hot pan and swirl until the bottom is thinly and evenly coated. Cook until the batter sets and the edges become golden—less than 1 minute. Flip and cook another 15 seconds. Lay on a rack. Repeat until all are cooked.
Notes
*Sweet Variation: Add 2 T sugar or honey *Savory Variation: Add ¼ t salt Preparation Tips: Only use whole wheat pastry flour. Bread flour or regular whole wheat flour will produce a tougher crepe. Flipping the crepe in the air is easier than using a spatula—try it. If you made your crepes in advance, wrap them in a damp paper towel and again in a tea towel and microwave briefly—about 2 seconds per crepe.

Storing: Stack crepes once they’ve cooled and store them in an air-tight container for up to 5 days in the fridge.  To freeze, stack them with wax paper between each crepe, and place them in an air-tight freezer bag in the freezer for up to 2 months

Stuffings and Toppings: The other half of the fun.  You don’t have to do much to make them tasty.  My children love to top them with a squirt of lemon followed with a sprinkle of powdered sugar.

Savory Ham & Spinach

Filling for savory or plain crepes       Yield: 3 cups

    • 1 T olive oil

    • 3 oz. ham, chopped

    • 1 small onion, chopped

    • 1clove garlic, minced

    • 6 – 8 cups chopped spinach

    • 1/2 cup grated cheese, try gouda, Swiss or gruyere

    • 1/4 cup chopped herbs like dill (optional)

    • 1/4 cup half & half or cream

    • Salt & pepper to taste

    • 6 – 8 plain or savory crepes for stuffing

Directions

Heat olive oil in a medium skillet.  Add onions, a little salt, and ham and sauté until onions are glassy.  Add garlic and sauté another minute.  Next add spinach and cook until barely wilted.  Add cream and grated cheese and continue to scook on medium heat, stirring constantly until it thickens.  Add pepper and more salt if needed.

To Assemble: Add about 1/2 cup to each crepe, roll and serve. Or place in a baking pan, cover with grated cheese and bake at 325 F for 10 minutes or until cheese has melted.

Simple Strawberry Compote

Filling for sweet or plain crepes    Yield: 4 cups

  •  2 pints strawberries, sliced

  • 3 T sugar

  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon

  • Garnish with whipped cream, ice cream or chocolate sauce

Directions

In a sauce pan, add all ingredients and cook over medium heat until sauce thickens.  Ladle over crepe, garnish and serve.

 

 

Springtime Frittata

A meal made with fresh eggs from my favorite farmer, Bob, couldn’t be easier not to mention delicious. I’m not certain why I don’t do it more often. Of all the egg dishes, the frittata or flat omelet reigns supreme welcoming any left-over bits or odd & end veggie I have in the fridge.

A frittata is simply the Italian version of the flat omelet. A flat omelet cooks in a skillet and is not folded. It is instead finished by flipping completely (a sometimes messy affair) or placing under a broiler. Other cuisines use flat omelets. In Spain they have the tortilla made with eggs and potatoes (different than the Mexican tortilla made of corn or flour) and in Persia they have a flat omelet called a kookoo.

Every time I make this particular combination, people gobble it up and ask for more. It is perfect for spring as it makes the most of the veggies available early in the season. Serve it with a simple salad of greens or a chopped Italian salad in sticking with the Italian theme. You’ll have a complete meal in less than 30 minutes.


Springtime Frittata
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Dish, Breakfast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 8 slices
 
Ingredients
  • 8 eggs
  • 4 oz. bacon, finely chopped
  • 5 cups fresh spinach, chopped—about 8 oz.
  • 1 lb. new potatoes, cut into ½ inch chunks—about 3 cups
  • ½ cup green onion, chopped
  • ¼ cup Parmesan cheese, grated
  • ½ t salt
  • ½ t pepper
  • Olive oil if the pan needs more oil
Instructions
  1. Wash and chop new potatoes leaving skins on. Boil or microwave until just tender—about 10 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, beat the eggs, salt, pepper and cheese in a large bowl.
  3. In a 12 or 14-inch non-stick or caste iron skillet, cook the chopped bacon over medium heat until crisp.
  4. Next, add the spinach to the same pan; cook until barely wilted.
  5. Next toss in the cooked potatoes, green onions (and olive oil if necessary). Add in the egg mixture and stir with a rubber spatula evenly distributing the ingredients.
  6. Cook for about 5 minutes on medium heat until the egg sets on the bottom and begins to set on top.
  7. Place under a broiler on low for 3 - 4 minutes until golden (watch it closely) or flip into another heated skillet. Cut into wedges and serve hot or cold.

Cooking with Kids:

My kids love to crack eggs.  They are not necessarily good at it, but it fills their little hearts with such joy.  How can I deny them the experience? Even though it sounds scary, teach your kids how to crack eggs and let them try. As long as they are standing over a table and given a very large separate bowl to fish the shells out of, why not.  They can also be placed in charge of whisking.  Again, don’t forget the large bowl.  Remind them, “One hand holds the bowl, one hand whisks.” If you’re near my kitchen on a day we’re making frittata, you’re bound to hear, “God gave you 2 hands, please use them both.” Over, and over, and over.